Watch Meryl Streep, Christine Baranski and Audra McDonald Sing Sondheim in Their Bathrobes – and Drink (Video)

The three actresses performed together in the online concert “Take Me To The World: A Sondheim 90th Birthday Celebration”

Meryl Streep, Christine Baranski and Audra McDonald wowed on Sunday night during an online concert celebrating the 90th birthday of legendary Broadway composer Stephen Sondheim.

Appearing from their respective homes in their bathrobes, the actresses performed a spot-on and hilarious rendition of “The Ladies Who Lunch” from Sondheim’s 1970 musical “Company” — complete with swigs from wine goblets and cocktail glasses (and in Streep’s case, directly from the bottle).

The actresses seemed to relish the “I’ll drink to that” refrain from the classic tune, which was first performed by Elaine Stritch on Broadway (and more recently by Patti LuPone in a revival that was due to open this month before the coronavirus pandemic shut down Broadway theaters).

The trio joined a host of Tony-winning luminaries for the online event, including Neil Patrick Harris, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Patti LuPone, Bernadette Peters, Josh Groban, Jake Gyllenhaal, Jason Alexander and even Steven Spielberg (who didn’t sing but gave an online shout-out to Sondheim).

Tony winner Raúl Esparza helped organize the event to raise money for Artists Striving to End Poverty), which generated donations through the Broadway.com YouTube channel. Drama Desk Award winner Mary-Mitchell Campbell served as music director for the concert, with Paul Wontorek directing.

Watch the full “The Ladies Who Lunch” performance below. You can also check out the full two-hour-plus concert, “Take Me to the World: A Sondheim 90th Birthday Celebration,” here.

All the Broadway Shows Killed (and Postponed) Due to Coronavirus Shutdown

  • When New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo closed Broadway theaters on March 12 in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the New York theater scene was heating up ahead of the Tony Awards — with 31 shows playing and another eight scheduled to begin performances by mid-April. Now the theaters will remain dark until at least June 7 — the date the now-postponed Tony Awards were scheduled to take place. But the uncertainty of when theaters (and Broadway-bound tourists) might return has forced some producers to close shows early — or push new productions to sometime in the future.

  • Closed: “Hangmen” 

    Martin McDonagh’s new comedy, starring Dan Stevens (“Downton Abbey”) and Mark Addy (“Game of Thrones”), announced March 20 it would not reopen after playing 13 preview performances ahead of an expected March 19 official opening.

  • Closed: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” 

    The revival of Edward Albee’s classic drama, starring Laurie Metcalf and Rupert Everett, had played just nine preview performances before Broadway went dark. With the scheduled April 9 official opening off the table, producers decided to close the show on March 21.

  • Postponed: “Flying Over Sunset”

    The new musical by composer Tom Kitt (“Next to Normal,” pictured), lyricist Michael Korie (“Grey Gardens”) and book writer James Lapine (“Into the Woods”) was scheduled to begin performances on March 12 ahead of an official April 16 opening. On March 24 the Lincoln Center Theater announced the show’s opening would be pushed to the fall.

  • Postponed: “Birthday Candles” 

    Noah Haidle’s play, starring Debra Messing and Andre Braugher, was due to begin performances in early April. But on March 25, Roundabout Theatre Company announced it would open this fall instead.

  • Postponed: “Caroline, or Change” 

    Roundabout also delayed the opening of its revival of the Jeanine Tesori-Tony Kushner musical “Caroline, or Change,” starring Sharon D. Clarke in an Olivier Award-winning performance. The show had been set for an April 7 opening at Studio 54.

  • Postponed: “How I Learned to Drive” 

    Manhattan Theatre Club announced on April 7 it was postponing a Mary-Louise Parker-led revival of “How I Learned to Drive” to the 2020-21 season. The Pulitzer-winning drama, with David Morse as co-star, was due to open April 22, just before the cutoff for this year’s Tony Awards.

  • Closed: “Beetlejuice” 

    The Tony-nominated musical was being evicted from the Winter Garden Theatre on June 6 (even though ticket sales had dramatically improved over the fall and winter). Now producers are hoping to find a new theater when Broadway opens up, though there’s no guarantee that will happen. The adaptation of Tim Burton’s 1988 movie played played 27 previews and 366 regular performances.

  • Postponed: The Tony Awards  

    Since there’s no word yet on when Broadway performances might resume, the Broadway League on March 25 indefinitely postponed this year’s Tony Awards, which had been scheduled for June 7 at Radio City Music Hall.

“Beetlejuice” is the latest affected

When New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo closed Broadway theaters on March 12 in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the New York theater scene was heating up ahead of the Tony Awards — with 31 shows playing and another eight scheduled to begin performances by mid-April. Now the theaters will remain dark until at least June 7 — the date the now-postponed Tony Awards were scheduled to take place. But the uncertainty of when theaters (and Broadway-bound tourists) might return has forced some producers to close shows early — or push new productions to sometime in the future.

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