Newly branded Aunt Jemima pancake mixes, syrups hit shelves as Pearl Milling Company

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Grocery stores have started rolling out the newly branded Aunt Jemima line of breakfast products. 

Shoppers may find the Pearl Milling Company breakfast products at supermarkets nationwide a year after Quaker Oats promised to discontinue its Aunt Jemima packaging for being "based on a racial stereotype." 

Pearl Milling Company products, formerly branded Aunt Jemima, have started to hit shelves in select grocery stores. (Pearl Milling Company). 

Pearl Milling Company representatives confirmed to USA Today the newly branded pancake and syrup products have started shipping and the transition to a fully rebranded product line will take a few months.

The Pearl Milling Company has already hit shelves at a Publix supermarket in Florida stacked next to old aunt Jemima branded items and a Ralphs supermarket in Culver City, California also had the new Pearl Milling Company bottles next to the formerly branded ones, according to USA Today. 

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PepsiCo, the parent company of Pearl Milling last June, said the company would change the name of its Aunt Jemima product line amid social justice movements and a national racial reckoning for equality. 

The new Pearl Milling products, boxed in the same red boxes found under the Aunt Jemima brand, will not have a character image on the front. The inspiration behind Pearl Milling, PepsiCo said in a press release earlier this year, is the Pearl Milling Company, the originator of the self-rising pancake mix founded in 1888 in St. Joseph, Missouri. It was later named Aunt Jemima when the Quaker Oats Company signed a contract to buy the Aunt Jemima brand in 1925. 

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PepsiCo said in June the Aunt Jemima branded products without the character image would be on store shelves until June. 

A number of food brands have undergone a rebranding for being associated with racial stereotypes. Uncle Ben's last month returned to shelves with its new name Ben's Original for its rice products now at retailers across the country, Mars Food announced. And Conagra Brands, owner of Mrs. Butterworth's line of syrups — bottled in the shape of a woman — and pancake mixes, said in June 2020 it was undergoing  "a complete brand and packaging review" of its products. 

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