A look at how styles of Italy and England managers differ

Battle of the two touchline trendsetters: A look at how the sartorial styles of Italy and England managers differ ahead of Euros final

  • On the Italian bench Roberto Mancini wears a powder blue-grey Armani blazer
  • Meanwhile at England games, Gareth Southgate has ditched the waistcoat
  • Southgate now wears an understated £680 navy suit made by London-based menswear brand, Percival

The two teams may play in contrasting styles…but it’s on the touchline where the differences are most pronounced.

On the Italian bench, perma-tanned manager Roberto Mancini shouts instructions wearing a powder blue-grey Armani blazer.

When the games start, his jacket comes off so he can gesticulate freely, sleeves rolled up to show off his Richard Mille watch which has 18 carats of white gold on it.

After each game, the 56-year-old former Manchester City boss exudes style as he strolls up to the media podium to give interviews with his jacket slung over one shoulder.

Meanwhile, at England games, Gareth Southgate has ditched the waistcoat he wore at the 2018 World Cup in Russia for an understated £680 navy suit made by London-based menswear brand, Percival.


On the Italian bench, perma-tanned manager Roberto Mancini (right) shouts instructions wearing a powder blue-grey Armani blazer. Meanwhile, at England games, Gareth Southgate has ditched the waistcoat he wore at the 2018 World Cup in Russia for an understated £680 navy suit made by London-based menswear brand, Percival (left)

Southgate, who asked the label to dress him, wears a lucky navy polka dot tie along with a white pocket square to complete the look. The 50-year-old tends to wear the jacket throughout each game as he encourages his players with a gentle clap of his hands.

Before the tournament, the Three Lions squad were kitted out in M&S navy suits, available for £199, white shirts, brown shoes and a navy tie with red and white stripes.

However, the squad prefers to travel to games wearing matching blue tracksuits and white trainers.

But it is the Armani suits, which are not for sale to the public, worn by the Italian players which have raised eyebrows during Euro 2020.

Their jackets are similar to Mancini’s stylish number – but have no collars.

Armani intended them to be a tribute to Enzo Bearzot, the coach behind Italy’s 1982 World Cup winning team, but fans have said they make the players look like pizza chefs or bellboys.

Disapproving fans described the design as ‘unsightly’ and ‘horrendous’, joking that Italy would come back bearing not just trophies but trays of hors d’oeuvres as well.

‘North Korea here we come,’ joked one, in reference to the low-cut Asian-style collars.Italy fan Luca Angiolini questioned the wisdom of kitting out the players in black shirts, an unfortunate echo of the colour worn by Mussolini’s staunchest Fascist supporters. ‘I wouldn’t have chosen a uniform with black shirts. But I’m not Armani,’ he said.

Armani, 86, said he was delighted with the design, which formed part of a four-year deal with the Italian Football Federation. ‘I imagined a light suit full of dignity, just as our spirit at this time must be dignified and proud,’ he said.

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