Ronnie OSullivan feels like Prince William but wouldnt know where to begin on role

Ronnie O'Sullivan on his fastest 147 against Mick Price

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Ronnie O’Sullivan faces Luca Brecel in the English Open quarter-finals this afternoon. The Rocket, 45, cruised past Jamie Clarke on Thursday night, hitting 50 or more in each of his four frames as he raced his way into the next round. Currently world number three, O’Sullivan admitted earlier this week, prior to facing Michael Georgiou, that his pre-match routine had been hit hard by a trip to a kebab shop.

He admitted he was “all over the gaff” a mere seven minutes before the match started, having been at the kebab shop “putting the world to rights” with his friends.

After going a frame down, he recovered to win 4-1.

Widely considered one of, if not the greatest snooker player of all time, O’Sullivan had been tipped for greatness since a young age.

Speaking last August at the Crucible, he admitted he had embraced the coronavirus pandemic and the absence of crowds.

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At last summer’s Betfred World Championship, which the Rocket ultimately won, he said in a press conference: “I’ve had pressure since the age of 10 or 11.

“An expectation level that I’d be a champion one day. So, I suppose in many ways, it’s like Prince William being groomed to be King.

“If you said to me: ‘Would you want Prince William’s role?’ I wouldn’t know where to begin.

“But he had had it since a child and it has become natural I suppose. For me, that’s the same metaphor for snooker.”

O’Sullivan explained he has learned to deal with pressure, having worked his way through the amateur and professional ranks to reach the very top.

He continued: “Prince Harry has one a runner. He doesn’t want the spotlight,

“I’ve been trying to do that all my life.

“That’s why you don’t see me at the venue much. I try to keep as much privacy as I can.”

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O’Sullivan felt that the Sussexes’ move to California represented a lifestyle that suited him much more.

Pressure has been on his shoulders ever since he posted his first 147 aged just 15.

The absence of crowds suited him as he didn’t feel the pressure and expectations.

He said: “I’m quite private, I don’t really socialise much anyway.”

O’Sullivan turned professional aged 16 in 1992, and won the UK Championship the following year, a week before his 18th birthday. 

He is globally renowned for being something of a showman, and has certainly played a crucial role in improving snooker’s image. His fast and attacking style regularly sees his matches end quickly.

Although he is right-handed, he can also play remarkably well with his left, allowing him to attempt shots that might otherwise need a rest or spider.

He was accused of disrespect in the 1996 World Championship after displaying this left-handed ability. Canadian opponent Alain Robidoux refused to shake his hands after the match.

The Queen honoured O’Sullivan with an OBE in the New Years Honours list in 2016 despite his initial reluctance to the idea.

He said in 2013 that it would be a “disgrace” to give one to “someone like me”.

He said: “I’m just not that type of guy, am I?”

But, upon receiving the award, he said: “I am extremely grateful for this recognition which is a great honour and has made both myself and my family very proud.”

He said it came as a “great surprise”, then thanked his family, friends and fans for their support along the way.

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