Fetty Wap Talks About Loyalty in First Statement Since Drug Trafficking Arrest

The ‘How We Do Things’ rapper, who was arrested in October on a drug trafficking charge, was released from prison earlier this month after posting a $500,000 bond.

AceShowbizFetty Wap has spoken out for the first time since his recent trouble with the law. A few weeks after he got arrested on a drug trafficking charge, the “Trap Queen” hitmaker took to social media to send a message about loyalty.

Making use of Instagram on Thursday, November 18, the 30-year-old uploaded a video that features a promo for his latest studio effort, “The Butterfly Effect”. In the caption, he first wrote, “Loyalty can be both a great trait and a deadly one.”

“Choose wisely with who you stand with but never change what you stand for Never bend Never Fold,” he continued reminding his fans. “Head up like a nose bleed #ImOnBorrowedTime if it ain’t life it ain’t forever I’ll be back better wiser and smarter.”

Fetty was busted by FBI agents on October 28 ahead of his performance at the Rolling Loud Festival in New York. The emcee, who was arrested at the Citi Field stadium in Queens, was later charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute and possess controlled substances.

The “How We Do Things” spitter, born Willie Junior Maxwell II, was released earlier this month on a $500,000 bond after entering a not guilty plea. He is currently awaiting for his trial to begin. If convicted, he will be facing life in prison.

Fetty was let go from jail on several conditions. John Marzulli, a spokesman with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York, divulged that the hip-hop star must wear a GPS monitoring device, submit drug testing results, surrender his passport and ask for approval from authorities before traveling.

Fetty was arrested after he, along with five others, allegedly trafficked more than 100 kilograms of opioids. Federal prosecutors claimed that the men transported and distributed cocaine, fentanyl, heroin and crack cocaine from the West Coast and sold the deadly drugs in New Jersey and Long Island.

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